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CTE - Assessment Workbook

This guide provides information, resources, and templates for assessing student learning outcomes at Central Penn College.

 

curriculum map is a visualization of the student learning experience by providing a matrix where programmatic learning outcomes intersect with the specific courses in which they are represented in a significant way.  Often, a curriculum map will also detail the level at which the student is expected to achieve a certain learning outcome.  The level of achievement is itself determined by the emphasis placed on that particular learning outcome in the course whether through the course description, course or weekly outcomes, assessments, skills, or topics. 

 

Purpose of a Curriculum Map

A curriculum map provides crucial information about the current programs, outcomes, and courses, including:

  • identify where program learning outcomes are sufficiently covered in the curriculum
  • identify where program learning outcomes are insufficiently covered in the curriculum
  • create recommendations for changes to programs, outcomes, and courses
  • recognize areas where additional assessment needs to occur
  • demonstrate commitment to programmatic and curricular improvement and assessment

 

When a curriculum map has been completed, you will want to:

  1. Determine that all goals and/or outcomes have been measured at least once
  • if they have not, you can begin reviewing the curriculum for areas where coverage of that goal and/or outcome can be emphasized

  1. Determine that all goals and/or outcomes have been sufficiently covered in the curriculum or that they do not tend to cluster around one or two goals
  • if they have not been sufficiently covered, you can begin reviewing the curriculum for areas where coverage of that goal and/or outcome can be emphasized
  • if they tend to cluster, you might want to discuss dividing that goal(s) and/or outcome(s) into separate goal(s) and/or outcome(s)

 

Ultimately, you will want to use the curriculum map as a:

  • visualization of the student learning experience in your program and courses.
  • starting place for conversations about changes to your program, outcomes, and courses.
  • guide for determining the specific location of artifacts of student learning for assessment.

 

When developing a curriculum map, you should keep in mind the particular purpose(s) you have for its creation. Depending on the purpose and/or program you are assessing, you may want to begin by listing your goals or outcomes at the top of the matrix:

PLO #1

PLO #2

PLO #3

PLO #4

PLO #5

Total

 

If you have sub-goals or outcomes, you may want to list them under each goal:

PLO #1

PLO #2

PLO #3

PLO #4

PLO #5

Total

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

 

You will then list out the courses in your curriculum and mark places where this goal is emphasized.  You can determine if a goal or outcome is being emphasized by reviewing the course description, course or weekly outcomes, assessments, skills, or topics:

PLO #1

PLO #2

PLO #3

PLO #4

PLO #5

Total

Courses

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

CRS100

X

X

X

X

X

X

6

 

These curriculum maps are helpful when determining the location of assessment artifacts; however, they do not detail the level to which these artifacts may speak to the specific goal or outcome you are attempting to measure. 

 

If you want to create a more specific curriculum map, you may want to mark these areas with:


I = introduce knowledge and skill by focusing on skills of identification, definition, reporting, and recognition.

These introductory-level courses provide prerequisite or foundational knowledge and skills for other, more specialized courses.  Often, 100-level courses and survey courses will fit into this category.

 

R = reinforce knowledge and skills through application, development, and analysis.

These courses support and further the development of knowledge and skills from the introductory-level course.  Often, 200-level courses and some 300-level courses will fit into this category.

 

M = master knowledge and skills through synthesis, evaluation, and creation

These courses evaluate the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program and ask student to demonstrate and synthesize from a variety of previous learning experiences.  Often, 400-level courses and some 300-level courses will fit into this category.

 

A completed map with the “I,” “R,” and “M” designations may also include a total column to help further visualization the covered of goals and their emphasis throughout the curriculum:

PLO #1

PLO #2

PLO #3

PLO #4

PLO #5

Total

Courses

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

a.

b.

c.

I

R

M

CRS100

I

R

I

R

R

I

3

3

0